Watch live: SpaceX launches South Korea’s 1st military satellite

Update: SpaceX is now targeting 5:30 p.m. EDT (2130 GMT) for the launch of Anasis-II.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a South Korean military satellite into orbit today, July 20, and you can watch it live online, courtesy of SpaceX.


The Falcon 9 will launch the Anasis-II military communications satellite from Space Launch Complex 40 of the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 5:30 p.m. EDT (2130 GMT). The mission does have a nearly four-hour launch window that closes at 8:55 p.m. EDT (0055 July 21 GMT). SpaceX’s webcast will begin 15 minutes before launch. Look for it here at 5:15 p.m. EDT (2115 GMT).


SpaceX will also livestream live audio from the launch control center. The live video feet will shut off after the Falcon 9 booster landing
at the request of SpaceX’s customer, but the mission control audio feed will continue for the full mission.
The Anasis-II satellite is billed as South Korea’s first military satellite and was built by Airbus Defence and Space. It is designed to “provide secured communications over wide coverage,” according to Airbus.
Here is the Mission Control Audio feed from SpaceX:
SpaceX is targeting Monday, July 20 for Falcon 9’s launch of the ANASIS-II mission, which will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The primary launch window opens at 5:00 p.m. EDT, or 21:00 UTC, and closes at 8:55 p.m. EDT, or 00:55 UTC on July 21.Falcon 9’s first stage previously launched Crew Dragon to the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on board.
You can watch the launch webcast here, starting about 15 minutes before liftoff.
Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Just Read the Instructions” droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean. The ANASIS-II spacecraft will deploy about 32 minutes after liftoff. Per the customer’s request, live coverage will end shortly after first stage landing.
UPDATE for 10 am ET: SpaceX has called off today’s planned launch of 57 Starlink satellites and two BlackSky Global satellites in order to perform extra rocket checks. You can read our full story here.
SpaceX will launch its tenth batch of Starlink internet satellites Saturday (July 11) and you’ll be able to watch it live here.


A Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled to launch the Starlink mission at 10:54 a.m. EDT (1454 GMT), after a weather delay as well as an earlier delay to allow more checks with its Falcon 9 rockets. The mission is carrying 57 Starlink satellites and two BlackSky Global Earth-observing satellites under a rideshare agreement with Spaceflight Inc.


The first-stage booster for this flight is making its fourth trip to space. It was used to launch SpaceX’s uncrewed Demo-1 Crew Dragon mission in 2019, three Radarsat satellites for Canada and another Starlink mission earlier this year. The booster is expected to land on SpaceX’s drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You” in the Atlantic Ocean shortly after liftoff.
Related: SpaceX’s Starlink satellite megaconstellation launches in photos
SpaceX is targeting Saturday, July 11 at 10:54 a.m. EDT, 14:54 UTC, for launch of its tenth Starlink mission, which will include 57 Starlink satellites and 2 satellites from BlackSky, a Spaceflight customer. Falcon 9 will lift off from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
Falcon 9’s first stage previously supported Crew Dragon’s first demonstration mission to the International Space Station, launch of the RADARSAT Constellation Mission, and the fourth and seventh Starlink missions. Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean.
You can watch the launch webcast here, starting about 15 minutes before liftoff. If you would like to receive updates on Starlink news and service availability in your area, please visit starlink.com.
The BlackSky Global spacecraft will deploy sequentially beginning 1 hour and 1 minute after liftoff, and the Starlink satellites will deploy approximately 1 hour and 32 …
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